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21 Oct
0

Chadwick Boseman

EAST FLATBUSH, Brooklyn (WABC) — A large mural honoring the late actor Chadwick Boseman was unveiled Saturday in Brooklyn.

Artist Kenny Altidor created the mural which depicts Boseman as T’Challa, the iconic character he portrayed in “Black Panther” and other Marvel superhero movies.

The artwork will be on display on Clarendon Road in East Flatbush.

Boseman, who also played Black icons Jackie Robinson, Thurgood Marshall, and James Brown over his years in Hollywood, died in August after a four-year battle with colon cancer. He was 43 years old.

(c)F.Graham
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Andrew Schwartz/SIPA/Shutterstock (10904837c) Artist Kenny Altidor poses in front of a mural honoring actor Chadwick Boseman at Clarendon Rd and East 56th Street in the East Flatbush section of Brooklyn NY. Altidor created the mural featuring the actor as the Black Panther to pay tribute to Boseman who died from cancer this year. Chadwick Boseman Black Panther Tribute Mural, Brooklyn, New York, USA – 27 Sep 2020

https://abc7ny.com/video/embed/?pid=11568181

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19 Nov
0

Pop Smoke

So now he is painting Pop Smoke and he wants his message to be of peace, not the violence that has plagued the community as many people have been shot, some fatally.

“People here asked me to paint his mural – they loved the guy and so I’m just giving back to the community,” Altidor said. “My message in painting and paying tribute to him is a message of peace, love and unit among African Americans. His song, music – everyone loves his songs and so we want to honor him, but at the same time, the message needs to be you don’t have to commit violence or advance something on his behalf. I don’t think that’s what his mom or family would want.”

Altidor bemoans the gang war and says Pop Smoke should unite African Americans, not cause them to fight.

Brooklyn artist and life-long resident of Canarsie Kenny Altidor, 42, spends his afternoons finishing a second mural on East 80th Street and Flatlands Avenue on the side of a building that he says represents peace and love.

One mural is a finished: George Floyd, emblazoned on the top with “Black lives Matter.” He wants to remove the “black” and say “all.” He wants there to be no racial divide in his message of “peace and love.”

The second mural is of rapper Pop Smoke, a known Crips gang member who was murdered in his California home in February. The death of the rapper has been a source of violence throughout Brooklyn especially after five people were arrested three weeks ago reportedly from a rival gang.

Altidor said people in the community asked him to do the mural of Pop Smoke, already sketched eight feet high, one of the many “fallen heroes” that he has painted. He painted slain Police Officers Brian Mulkeen, Detective Brian Simonsen, Brian Moore, and after his death and Firefighter Steven Pollard who fell from a Belt Parkway Bridge while helping at a crash. He makes no distinction on cops, firefighters or rappers – heroes all

So now he is painting Pop Smoke and he wants his message to be of peace, not the violence that has plagued the community as many people have been shot, some fatally.

“People here asked me to paint his mural – they loved the guy and so I’m just giving back to the community,” Altidor said. “My message in painting and paying tribute to him is a message of peace, love and unit among African Americans. His song, music – everyone loves his songs and so we want to honor him, but at the same time, the message needs to be you don’t have to commit violence or advance something on his behalf. I don’t think that’s what his mom or family would want.”

Altidor bemoans the gang war and says Pop Smoke should unite African Americans, not cause them to fight.

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19 Nov
0

George Floyd

A mural painted by artist Kenny Altidor depicting George Floyd is unveiled on a sidewall of CTown Supermarket in the Brooklyn borough New York City. George Floyd was killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis and his death has sparked a national reckoning about race and policing in the United States. | July 13, 2020 |

Kenny Altidor It was an honor to paint this mural for George Floyd’s family, and may this mural be a symbol of justice for George Floyd , pain , hope, unity and love all over the world 🌎.

“I’ve been painting fallen officers for 17 years. When I saw the way they were painting all officers as bad, I thought I had to do something to bridge the gap between the community and the men in blue who served and protected our community.

“I decided to honor and pay tribute to George Floyd by doing a mural for the family and also to connect the NYPD officers to my community.

“Going forward, I hope we don’t have to protest or wait for another George Floyd case for us to get justice when something happens. ”

Kenny Altidor, Hatian-born artist, Brooklyn, New York
NEW YORK, NY – JULY 13: A mural painted by artist Kenny Altidor depicting George Floyd is unveiled on a sidewall of CTown Supermarket on July 13, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough New York City. George Floyd was killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis and his death has sparked a national reckoning about race and policing in the United States. (Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

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19 Oct
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19 Oct
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19 Oct
0

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19 Oct
0

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19 Oct
0

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26 Feb
1

Detective Miosotis Familia

“Anyone who knew her knew that she loved her family and she loved her friends,” her daughter Genesis said. “And that’s not only her blood-related family but also her blue family as well. My mom loved being a cop she loved every part of it.”

A mural depicting Familia was unveiled in 2019. It was specifically placed on the side of the precinct to watch over and “smile down” on the officers stationed there.

On a corner in the Bronx strained by steady rancor over unsolved crimes, and distrust of the police, Officer Miosotis Familia was a balm.

[Related: 2 police officers shot and killed in McAllen, Texas.]

She had earned a reputation as “a good policewoman” in the short time she was assigned to an R.V.-style police command post at East 183rd Street and Morris Avenue, two miles north of Yankee Stadium, a longtime resident, Roma Martinez, said. She waved hello; she spoke Spanish.

But long before she arrived, a hostility toward law enforcement personnel was building in Alexander Bonds, who had been in and out of prisons and jails for 15 years and was slipping into severe mental illness. Last year he warned in a Facebook video that he would not back down if he encountered police officers on the streets: “I got broken ribs for a reason, son. We gonna shake.”

About three hours later, with Fourth of July fireworks still going off, Mr. Bonds strode up to Officer Familia’s command post and fired a .38-caliber revolver through a window, killing her with a bullet to the head. She was the first female New York Police Department officer killed in the line of duty since the Sept. 11 attacks, and only the third female officer killed in a combat-type encounter in the department’s history.

The New York City police commissioner, James P. O’Neill, said in a message to officers that she was “assassinated without warning, without provocation, in a direct attack on police officers assigned to safeguard the people of New York City.” And once again the city was plunged into mourning over a targeted police killing that appeared to result in part from a swirl of mental illness and anger at the police, two and a half years after a man with a similar history fatally shot two officers through their patrol car windows.

In the command post around 12:30 a.m., Officer Familia’s partner, Vincent Maher, pleaded for help over the radio: “My partner’s shot! My partner’s shot!” His call drew scores of officers and turned stretches of Independence Day festivities into a crime scene.

Officers chased Mr. Bonds, 34, who wore a black hooded sweatshirt, black pants, black sneakers and black gloves. When they confronted him, he pointed his five-shot Ruger revolver at them and fired, a preliminary investigation indicates. The officers — a sergeant and a patrol officer — shot him dead. A bystander struck during the shootout was in stable condition.

 

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26 Feb
1

George Floyd

On Monday, May 25, 2020, George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was murdered near the intersection of East 38th Street and Chicago Avenue in the Powderhorn Park neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Derek Chauvin, a white police officer with the Minneapolis Police Department.[4] Floyd had been arrested on suspicion of using a counterfeit $20 bill. Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for over nine minutes while Floyd was handcuffed and lying face-down in the street.[5][6][7] Two other police officers, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane, assisted Chauvin in restraining Floyd. Lane had also pointed a gun to Floyd’s head prior to Floyd being put in handcuffs.[8] A fourth police officer, Tou Thao, prevented bystanders from interfering.[9]

Prior to being placed on the ground, Floyd had exhibited signs of anxiety, complaining about having claustrophobia and being unable to breathe.[10] After being restrained he became more distressed, complaining of breathing difficulties and the knee on his neck, and expressing fear of imminent death.[5] After several minutes, Floyd stopped speaking.[5] For the last couple of minutes, he lay motionless and Officer Kueng found no pulse when urged to check.[11][12] Despite this, Chauvin ignored pleas from bystanders to lift his knee until told to do so by paramedics.

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